Mobility: Key Enabler For Clinicians To Care For Patients

David Lafferty, CIO, Tidewell Hospice
737
1221
263

David Lafferty, CIO, Tidewell Hospice

Challenges in technology to meet enterprise needs in 2013 and expectations

The volume of data that an enterprise will need to consume and analyze to make effective patient care decisions will become enormous.

Mobile technology will comprise a significant challenge in the future. To be successful, mobile technology providers will need to collaborate closely with EMR (Electronic Medical Records) providers to embrace open and transparent methods to integrate and assimilate this data.

The areas in business environment where solutions do not yet exist or not up to the mark and which if existed, would've made job easier

In hospice care, mobility is a key enabler for our clinicians to care for patients in a variety of settings. While great strides have been made with technologies that eliminate paper forms, the simple reality is that the need for paper documents is still very apparent in today's health care arena.

Manner in which data is used to head off problems and complications before they happen

I can think of two examples that have proven beneficial for our patients. Homebased, tele health monitors enable many patients to remain at home. By providing routine and regular monitoring of key vital signs, nurses are alerted to changing trends in a patient's condition well before that trend progresses to a sentinal event. Tidewell also employs mobile GPS-based technology for triage nurses, clinicians that respond to urgent, critical needs that arise in the patients' home. Tidewell's Android-based system enables quick and efficient dispatching of nurses that are
closest to the patient location; viewable on a live map of the service area from Tidewell's call center.

Thoughts on how IT strategic planning supports organization-wide efforts to improve quality, cut costs and improve efficiency in the Healthcare sector

This starts with being closely connected to clinical leadership and being in touch with Tidewell's care teams. I routinely visit hospice houses or shadow an admission nurse first hand, in order to better identify areas where technology can improve our care process. My goal is that technology should not become a barrier to care, but rather a trusted tool. Secondly, the
executive leadership starting with the CEO, must be an advocate in the use of technology. This ensures that the CIO has dialog 'at the table' to be an integral part of the organization's success.

Technology trends impacting enterprise business environment

Cloud computing is already having a significant and positive impact on us. Cloud-based solutions present a cost effective and highly capable solution. The consumerization of IT is also having a huge impact.

My roles and responsibilities as a CIO

I've been fortunate to have held senior leadership roles in a variety of industries. As a result, it has allowed me to amass expertise in solutions that address a multitude of needs. I now spend the bulk of my role digging into the business, our process, our competition, and our risk; and then applying the best technology for the need.

Lessons learned and advice for fellow CIOs

Be an exceptional communicator. Admit when you're wrong and learn from your mistakes. Be accountable and hold others accountable: Do what you say, say when it will be done, and when you can't proactively fix it.

Read Also

Transformational Leadership in the IT&S Setting

Pam Banchy, CIO, VP Clinical Informatics, Western Reserve Hospital/Western Reserve Health System

Clinical Informatics and the Promise of Advanced Technologies

Michelle Woodley, Chief Nursing Information Officer, St. Joseph Health

Change Agents in a Digital Healthcare World: People, Culture and Strategy

Charles Koontz, President & CEO, GE Healthcare IT & Chief Digital Officer, GE Healthcare